Event series

Photo Album | Debate | The ‘two-speed Europe’ project and the Brexit negotiations: a combined unity test?

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INVITATION | DEBATE | The ‘two-speed Europe’ project and the Brexit negotiations: a combined unity test? (April 26)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the ‘two-speed Europe’ project and the Brexit negotiations as a unity test for the EU with our distinguished speakers Ms Danuta Maria Hubner MEP (EPP/PL), Mr Jo Leinen MEP (S&D/DE), Mr Michael Theurer MEP (ALDE/DE).

The debate will be moderated by Graham Bishop, leading expert in EU and UK Economic, Financial and Government Affairs.

About the debate

While the UK was grappling with internal disagreements on both the timing of the triggering of Article 50 and the establishment of the extent to which the British Parliament should have controlled the Brexit process, the leaders of the EU’s four largest economies organised a meeting in Paris in order to prepare the 25th of March EU summit in Rome and (re) launch the so-called ‘two-speed Europe’ proposal, namely a newly reinvigorated method to forge ahead with integration, while leaving those not on board free to join when they deem it appropriate. These political developments can also have been interpreted as a first reaction to the so-called ‘White Paper’ in which President Juncker outlined the main challenges and opportunities for Europe in the coming decade and presented five scenarios according to which the European Union could evolve by 2025, depending on how it will respond.

In fact, as massive attention has focused on the possible economic impacts of the Brexit referendum on both the UK and the EU, how the EU bloc itself might change will probably prove to be the most important outcome of this particular political and institutional momentum that the old continent is undergoing. Not without controversy, the Rome summit declaration acknowledged, both in tone and content, the need to ‘act together, at different paces and intensity where necessary, while moving in the same direction’, whereas particular emphasis was given to the question of unity by stating that the European Union is ‘undivided and indivisible’. Indeed, the issue stemming from this last question will be of crucial importance for the achievement of a safe, secure, prosperous and sustainable Europe, which should play a major role at a global level in the years to come.

If the so–called ‘populist movements’ have shaken up the political narrative as well as the public debates both at EU and national level, they do not seem for the time in a position to gain sufficient power to lead to a radical change of Europe’s political and institutional landscape. However, it is not possible to exclude such a scenario becoming reality in the future, if change does not occur fairly soon. Within this context, the possible implementation of the ‘two-speed Europe’ process, the Brexit negotiations, as well as the European Union capacity to adapt to the current circumstances remain elements of capital importance for the years to come. Will the ‘two-speed Europe’ project and the Brexit negotiations constitute a combined unity test?

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7h00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 26th of April at Science14 Atrium, rue de la Science 14-B, Brussels.

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

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Photo Album | Debate | ETS and renewables: a win-win strategy? (March 21)

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INVITATION | Debate | ETS and renewables: a win-win strategy? (March 21)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the link between the European emission trading system (ETS) and renewables with our distinguished speakers Mr Peter Zapfel, Head of Unit, ETS Policy Development and Auctioning, European Commission, Mr Ruud Kempener, Policy Officer, Renewables and CCS Policy Unit, European Commission, Mr Michel Matheu, Head of EU strategy, EDF, and Mr Daniel Fraile, Senior Analyst, Wind Europe.

Mr Florent Le Strat, Researcher and Expert, Climate policy R&D, EDF, will hold an introductory speech about a recent EDF study entitled “Towards a successful coordination of climate energy policies”

The debate will be moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist

This event was kindly sponsored by

edf-logo-grande-colori-matteo

About the debate

The emission trading system (ETS) revision, one of the European Union’s pivotal policy instruments for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) for the period 2021-2030, has been approved by the European Parliament’s plenary vote in mid-February and is now to be discussed under the lead of the Maltese Presidency. Given the width of the scope, the European and international repercussion of the EU decision-making on climate change, as well as the issues at stake for the industry, the draft law has this far been object of intense discussions. Many commentators and policy makers are not convinced that this setting will be sufficient to strengthen the climate-change ambition of the ETS.One of the reasons is that the more general issue of ensuring a cost-effective energy transition has been set aside. The difficulties in maintaining consistency between the ETS and so-called ‘overlapping policies’ might well have been under-estimated. In particular, the interplay between the reform and the growth of power generation from renewable sources is a crucial factor for a cost-effective energy transition and has been overshadowed by the request for exemptions for specific economic sectors.

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Photo Album | Debate | What could be the features of the Pan-European Personal Pensions initiative (PEPP)? (March 8)

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INVITATION | Debate | What could be the features of the Pan-European Personal Pensions initiative (PEPP)? (March 8)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion about  the possible features of the Pan-European Personal Pensions initiative (PEPP) with our distinguished speakers Ms Nathalie Berger, Head of Unit, Insurance and Pension, European Commission, DG FISMA, Mr Heinz K. Becker MEP (EPP/AU), Mr Bernard Delbecque, Senior Director, Economics & Research, EFAMA and Mr Guillaume Prache, Managing Director, Better Finance.

Ms Sultana Sandrell, Trade, Economic and Financial Affairs Unit, Maltese Presidency of the Council of the EU and Mr Philippe Setbon, Member of the AFG Strategic Committee, will respectively hold an introductory speech.

The debate will be moderated by Mr Pierre Bollon, Chief Executive, AFG (French Asset Management Association). 

This event was kindly sponsored by

AFG_QUADRI

About the debate

The European Commission has recently announced that it will propose a legislative initiative to launch a framework for Pan-European Personal Pensions (PEPP) by the summer 2017, with the objective of enhancing the resources of future pensioners. European pension systems are indeed facing the dual challenge of remaining financially sustainable  while being able to provide Europeans with adequate resources when retiring. Along with occupational retirement schemes  such as  pension funds, PEPPs are be seen as a complement to state-run pension systems. The future PEPPs could also be a useful tool for the growing category of self-employed workers  who  cannot access an employee retirement scheme, and the increasing mobility of workers. Lastly they could  fit appropriately into the Capital Market Union project as they could provide long-term financing for the European economy.

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Photo Album | Debate | Will the year 2017 be a defining moment for the EU? (February 28)

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INVITATION | Debate | Will the year 2017 be a defining moment for the EU? (February 28)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on  the challenges the EU will be faced with in 2017 with our distinguished speakers Mr Markus Ferber MEP (EPP/DE), Mr Reinhard Butikofer MEP (Greens/DE), Mr Brando Benifei MEP (S&D/ITA) and Mr Pawel Swieboda, Deputy Head of the European Political Strategy Centre (EPSC).


The debate will be moderated by Chris Burns, longtime journalist and moderator 

With the kind support of

Burnstorm

About the debate

If Europe’s 2015 underlying features were the dragging on of the “Greek crisis‟ and the Eurozone macroeconomic imbalances, the main issues of the year 2016 have been the EU referendum and the refugee crisis. For the year 2017, along with the still standing neologism “Brexit‟, the keyword will most likely be “Populism‟. Although the interpretation and the possible consequences of this relatively new phenomenon vary according to the analytical approach adopted, it appears that this year Europe will not only be challenged in its capacity to react or contain a given emergency, but also in the way it will be able to regain cohesion and citizens’ trust. From the stand point of both EU institutions – national governments included – and the consolidation of the EU project itself, such evidence emerges despite the fact that the European and international economic outlook is finally improving. Indeed, finalising some of the most important long-standing issues related to the deepening of its integration process, the elaboration of new narratives or, at least, the setting up of an effective level-playing field will be crucial factors for Europe to give clear, tangible and positively-perceived responses to Europe’s (re)current challenges.

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Photo Album | Debate | Sustainable mobility, energy and innovation: paths towards a low-emission transport system (December 7)

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INVITATION | Debate | Sustainable mobility, energy and innovation: paths towards a low-emission transport system (December 7)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening discussion about the challenges of sustainable mobility and the path towards a low-emission transport system in the EU.

Mr Nikolaus von Peter, Member of the Cabinet of Commissioner Violeta Bulc, will hold a keynote speech.

The first panel debate will concern urban and electric mobility with our distinguished speakers:

  • Mr Helmut Morsi, Adviser, Transport Network, DG MOVE
  • Mr Patrick Gagnol, Project Manager, EDF – Mobilité Electrique
  • A representative of BYD Auto

The second panel debate will concern land and water transports with our distinguished speakers:

  • Ms Henna Virkkunen MEP (EPP/FI)
  • Ms Valentina Infante, Head of small scale LNG businesses, Edison
  • Mr Clément Chandon, Responsible for Gas Business Development, Iveco

The debate will be moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist

This event was kindly sponsored by

edf-logo-grande-colori-matteo

With the support of

edison_com_rgb_600_matteo

About the debate

Sustainable transport is one of the most promising areas – and challenging issues – that the European Union faces: transport use in Europe is growing and is already directly responsible for a quarter of carbon emissions. In order to improve efficiency and contribute to climate and environmental goals, the European Commission is promoting a strategy that recognises that sustainable transport is ‘an essential component of the broader shift to the low-carbon, circular economy needed for Europe to stay competitive and be able to cater to the needs of people and goods’.

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