Event series

INVITATION | Cyber Skills Gap : can gender balance fill the void? (November 7)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion about the cyber skills gap and whether a more gender balanced workforce could fill the void with our distinguished speakers Mr Rodrigo Ballester, Cabinet Member of Commissioner Navracsics, European Commission, Ms Silvia Merisio, Digital Economy and Skills – DG CONNECT, European Commission, Ms Lyndsay Turley, Head of Comms & Public Affairs EMEA, ISC(2), Ms Jacky Fox,  Director – Cyber Risk , Deloitte and Ms Emma Mohan-Satta, Fraud Prevention Consultant, Kaspersky Lab.

The debate will be moderated by Magnus Franklin, Chief Correspondent, MLex.

This event is kindly sponsored by

Within the framework of the European Cybersecurity Month

About the debate

Never before has there been a greater focus on cybersecurity, with large scale data breaches occurring on an almost weekly basis and devastating strains of Ransomware creating chaos across the globe, as Wannacry did in May 2017 and ExPetya last July. Governments around the world are struggling to come to terms with the challenges of network and data security, putting measures in place to protect businesses, citizens and the infrastructure upon which their economies are built. At the European level the Network Information Security Directive, the General Data Protection Regulation as well as the E-Privacy Regulation have been carefully designed in order to achieve these aims and the Communication “Resilience, Deterrence and Defence: Building strong cybersecurity for the EU”, which the Commission published on the 13th September 2017 reinforces such an action plan presenting new initiatives to further improve EU cyber resilience and response.

At the same time, developing the digital economy has emerged as a critical priority, placing further strain on IT infrastructure and therefore creating significant challenges ahead to make robust digital economies a reality. In such a context, adequate defence against cyber-attacks becomes a clear priority. However, the cybersecurity field is suffering from a massive skills shortage, with firms struggling to encourage fresh talent into the sector and to meet growing workforce demands. Without enough cybersecurity professionals, our digital assets and economies face an uncertain future. The gap, which is predicted to hit 1.8 million by 2022, is further exacerbated by a distinct lack of female representation – with women comprising only 11% of the workforce, according to a report produced by the Center for Cybersafety and Education and (ISC)².

In January 2017, the European Parliament Report on Civil Law Rules on Robotics explained that “getting more young women interested in a digital career and placing more women in digital jobs would benefit the digital industry, women themselves and Europe’s economy” and therefore called on the Commission and the Member States to “launch initiatives in order to support women in ICT and to boost their e-skills”. The European Commission’s Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition is very active in this domain. A possible solution to the Cyber skills gap could be to narrow the gender gap in cybersecurity; the Kaspersky Lab’s latest report tries to investigate the issue, and to find solutions.

Cyber Skills Gap: can gender balance fill the void?

 

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

 

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7h00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 7th of November at Science14 Atrium, rue de la Science 14-B, Brussels.

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

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Photo Album | Debate | What role for ‘Local Energy Communities’ in the EU energy transition process?

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INVITATION | What role for ‘Local Energy Communities’ in the EU energy transition process? (October 17)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the role of ‘Local Energy Communities’ in the EU energy transition process with our  distinguished speakers Mr Siim Meeliste, Counsellor for Energy, Estonian Presidency of the EU, Mr Antonio Lopez-Nicolas, Deputy Head of Unit, Renewable Energy and CCS Policy, European Commission, Dr Jan Ole Voss, Legal Advisor, European Renewable Energy Federation, Mr Josh Robert, Advocacy Officer, Rescoop.eu.

Mr Luis Arturo Hernández, Innovation Team Lead, Decentralised Energy Systems, E.ON will hold an introductory speech and participate in the panel.

The debate will be moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist.

This event is kindly sponsored by

About the debate

As the European Commission stated, ‘Renewable Energy Sources (RES) contribute to climate change mitigation through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, achieve sustainable development, protect the environment and improve citizens’ health. Moreover, renewable energy is also emerging as a driver of inclusive economic growth, creating jobs and reinforcing energy security across Europe’. The executive body has also remarked on several occasions the crucial importance for the EU to become a world leader in renewable energies, not only for their added value to economic growth, job creation and energy security, but also due to the current evolutions of the international and diplomatic context. Accordingly, in October 2014, the European Council agreed on the ‘2030 framework for climate and energy’ by reaffirming the Union’s long-term commitment to the EU ambitious low-carbon energy strategy. EU institutions also identified 2030 as the year in which the European Union target of 27% of renewable energy consumption across Europe should be reached.

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Album photos | Débat | Quelles conséquences économiques pour l’UE après le départ du Royaume-Uni?

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[FR] Débat | Quelles conséquences économiques pour l’UE après le départ du Royaume-Uni? | Lundi 25 septembre

Nous sommes heureux de vous inviter à participer à une soirée de discussion autour de la question des conséquences économiques pour l’UE après le départ du Royaume-Uni avec nos orateurs: Madame Pervenche Berès, députe européen, membre de la commission des affaires économiques et monétaires, Madame Cinzia Alcidi, chef de l’Unité de politique économique, Centre d’études politiques européennes – CEPS et Monsieur Mathieu Maes, Secrétaire général, Chambre de Commerce Internationale – Belgique.

Monsieur Stéphane Lopez, Ambassadeur,Représentant de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’Ue, tiendra un discours d’introduction.

Le débat sera modéré par Gabriel Gresillon, correspondant à Bruxelles pour Les Echos.

En partenariat avec

À propos du débat

Suite au referendum du juin 2016, en mars 2017, la Grande Bretagne a notifié au reste des pays de l’UE son intention de quitter l’Union conformément à l’article 50 du traité de Lisbonne. La sortie du Royaume-Uni de l’UE a soulevé une série de questions politiques, économiques et légales complexes et de nature différente, y compris s’agissant des obligations résultant de l’Article 50. Comme l’établi cet article du traité sur l’Union européenne, la période de négociation prévue de deux ans s’écoulera le 30 mars 2019 étant donné que le gouvernement britannique a informé le Conseil de l’intention de se retirer le 29 mars 2017. Cette date pourra être prolongée seulement avec un vote à l’unanimité des Etats membres. En ce qui concerne les négociations, fin juillet, le négociateur en chef de la Commission, Michel Barnier, déclarait après le deuxième round des discussions que, si « celui-ci était consacré à la présentation de nos positions communes, le troisième devra être celui des clarifications ».

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Photo Album | Debate | Sustainable City solutions: a central pillar for the next phase of the EU energy transition?

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INVITATION | Sustainable City solutions: a central pillar for the next phase of the EU energy transition? (June 20)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on sustainable city solutions as a central pillar for the next phase of the EU energy transition with our distinguished speakers Mr Dimitrios Sofianopoulos, New Energy Technologies, Innovation and Clean Coal, European Commission, DG ENERG, Ms Dorthe Nielsen, Policy Director, Eurocities, Mr Adrian Joyce, Secretary General, European Alliance of Companies for Energy Efficiency in Buildings (EuroACE) and Mr Marco Marijewycz, Technology Policy & Modelling, E.ON.

The debate will be moderated bu Hughes Belin, freelance journalist.

This event was kindly sponsored by

EON_Logo_4

Within the framework of

eusew-logo

About the debate

The executive body of the European Union announced its willingness “to lead the energy transition, not only adapt to it. For this reason, the EU has committed to cut CO2 emissions by at least 40% by 2030 while modernising the EU’s economy and delivering on jobs and growth for all European citizens”. The bold stance of the European Commission has multiple goals: firstly, the fostering of the modernisation of European economy and society in order to remain coherent with the obligations stemming from both the issue of climate change and the commitments of the Paris agreement. Secondly, this policy setting should not only lower both the demand and the dependency on fossil fuels, but should also lower energy costs for EU citizens who could eventually benefit from a more sustainable environment by the use of affordable and advanced solutions.

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Photo Album | Debate | Payments security: do the EBA RTS on strong customer authentication create an open and secure market for retail payments in Europe?

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INVITATION | Payments security: do the EBA RTS on strong customer authentication create an open and secure market for retail payments in Europe? (May 31)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the European Banking Authority’s (EBA) regulatory technical standards (RTS) on strong customer authentication and the creation of an open and secure market for retail payments in Europe with our distinguished speakers Ms Silvia Kersemakers, European Commission, Retail Financial Services and Payments, DG FISMA, Ms Marie Pascale Brien, Senior Policy Advisor, European Banking Federation, Mr Matthias Hönisch, Head of Card Business Unit, National Federation of Cooperative Banks and Ms Emma Mohan-Satta, Fraud Prevention Consultant, Kaspersky Fraud Prevention.

Ms Emma Mohan-Satta, Kaspersky Fraud Prevention will hold an introductory speech, while Mr Pascal König, Policy Advisor, E-commerce Europe, will be also present for comments.

The debate will be moderated by John Rega, Chief Correspondent, Financial Services at MLex

This event was kindly sponsored by

Kaspersky_CMYK_POS-300x96.160240

About the debate

The European Banking Authority (EBA) published on the 23rd of February its final draft Regulatory Technical Standards (RTS) on strong customer authentication and common and secure communication. These RTS, which were mandated under the revised Payment Services Directive (PSD2) and developed in close cooperation with the European Central Bank (ECB), are meant to lay the first stone for an open and secure market in retail payments in Europe. The final draft RTS are – in the EBA own words – “the result of difficult trade-offs between the various, at times competing, objectives of the PSD2, such as enhancing security, facilitating customer convenience, ensuring technology and business-model neutrality, contributing to the integration of the European payment markets, protecting consumers, facilitating innovation, and enhancing competition through new payment initiation and account information services”.

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Photo Album | Debate | The ‘two-speed Europe’ project and the Brexit negotiations: a combined unity test?

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