PUBAFFAIRS NEWS & DEBATES

Photo Album | Debate | What role for ‘Local Energy Communities’ in the EU energy transition process?

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Thank you for attending our debate ‘What role for ‘Local Energy Communities’ in the EU energy transition process?’

PubAffairs Bruxelles was delighted to host on the 17th of October the debate ‘What role for ‘Local Energy Communities’ in the EU energy transition process?’ between our distinguished speakers Mr Siim Meeliste, Counsellor for Energy, Estonian Presidency of the EU, Mr Antonio Lopez-Nicolas, Deputy Head of Unit, Renewable Energy and CCS Policy, European Commission, Dr Jan Ole Voss, Legal Advisor, European Renewable Energy Federation, Mr Josh Robert, Advocacy Officer, Rescoop.eu and Mr Luis Arturo Hernández, Innovation Team Lead, Decentralised Energy Systems, E.ON.

We would like to thank our distinguished guests, our sponsor, E.ON, and our moderator, Hughes Belin, freelance journalist, for allowing this debate to take place.

We hope that all the contributors, attendees, as well as our present and future members will join us for our next debate which will be held on the 7th of November

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SAVE THE DATE | Competitiveness of Europe and the biopharmaceutical industry: Are incentives a hindrance or a benefit? (November 22)

We are delighted to invite you to the debate organised by PubAffairs Bruxelles which will be held on Wednesday the 22nd of November at 19.00 at the premises of Science14 Atrium, rue de la Science, 14-B, Brussels. The event will consist of a debate about whether incentives in the biopharmaceutical industry are a hindrance or a benefit for Europe’s global competitiveness.  Although speakers and event details will be announced in the coming days, we are publishing this event now to make sure you save the date.

This event is kindly sponsored by

About the debate

The European Commission’s Communication on ‘Investing in a smart, innovative and sustainable industry – A renewed EU Industrial Policy Strategy’ was announced in the European Commission President Juncker’s September 2017 State of the Union address. The speech and the corresponding new Industrial Policy Strategy place considerable emphasis on innovation. At the same time the European Commission, as requested by EU member states in the EU Council Conclusions from June 2016, is currently analysing if the IP incentives and rewards system for the biopharmaceutical industry is fit for purpose. This includes assessing the impact of existing incentives on innovation, availability, accessibility and health systems sustainability. The primary question being asked is if incentives are helping to bring innovative new treatments to patients in areas of unmet medical needs.

The sustainability of healthcare expenditures is an essential question for every EU member state. At the same time, a change in the current IP incentives system would have an impact on Europe’s global competitiveness, the innovative biopharma industry, and the viability of European public-private partnerships in research. At stake are much needed high-skilled jobs and economic growth in Europe. Some commentators have argued that market exclusivity under the current IP regime is hindering competition, while others have pointed to the fact that a strong and predictable IP framework is needed to ensure investment into complex and high-risk areas such as biopharma innovation.

The assessment of the possible impact of changing the existing IP incentives on Europe’s global competitiveness, on patient’s access to innovative medicines, and on future innovation in European biopharma is crucial, especially in light of the new EU industrial policy strategy. Can Europe lead the world in life sciences, with its citizens first to benefit from the biologic and genomic revolution? Competitiveness of Europe and the biopharmaceutical industry: Are incentives a hindrance or a benefit?

 

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

 

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7h00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 22nd of November at Science14 Atrium, rue de la Science 14-B, Brussels.

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

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SAVE THE DATE | Cyber Skills Gap : can gender balance fill the void? (November 7)

We are delighted to invite you to the debate organised by PubAffairs Bruxelles which will be held on Tuesday the 7th of November at 19.00 at the premises of Science14 Atrium, rue de la Science, 14-B, Brussels. The event will consist of a debate about the cyber skills gap and whether a more gender balanced workforce could fill the void.

Although speakers and event details will be announced in the coming days, we are publishing this event now to make sure you save the date.

This event is kindly sponsored by

Within the framework of the European Cybersecurity Month

About the debate

Never before has there been a greater focus on cybersecurity, with large scale data breaches occurring on an almost weekly basis and devastating strains of Ransomware creating chaos across the globe, as Wannacry did in May 2017 and ExPetya last July. Governments around the world are struggling to come to terms with the challenges of network and data security, putting measures in place to protect businesses, citizens and the infrastructure upon which their economies are built. At the European level the Network Information Security Directive, the General Data Protection Regulation as well as the E-Privacy Regulation have been carefully designed in order to achieve these aims and the Communication “Resilience, Deterrence and Defence: Building strong cybersecurity for the EU”, which the Commission published on the 13th September 2017 reinforces such an action plan presenting new initiatives to further improve EU cyber resilience and response.

At the same time, developing the digital economy has emerged as a critical priority, placing further strain on IT infrastructure and therefore creating significant challenges ahead to make robust digital economies a reality. In such a context, adequate defence against cyber-attacks becomes a clear priority. However, the cybersecurity field is suffering from a massive skills shortage, with firms struggling to encourage fresh talent into the sector and to meet growing workforce demands. Without enough cybersecurity professionals, our digital assets and economies face an uncertain future. The gap, which is predicted to hit 1.8 million by 2022, is further exacerbated by a distinct lack of female representation – with women comprising only 11% of the workforce, according to a report produced by the Center for Cybersafety and Education and (ISC)².

In January 2017, the European Parliament Report on Civil Law Rules on Robotics explained that “getting more young women interested in a digital career and placing more women in digital jobs would benefit the digital industry, women themselves and Europe’s economy” and therefore called on the Commission and the Member States to “launch initiatives in order to support women in ICT and to boost their e-skills”. The European Commission’s Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition is very active in this domain. A possible solution to the Cyber skills gap could be to narrow the gender gap in cybersecurity; the Kaspersky Lab’s latest report tries to investigate the issue, and to find solutions.

Cyber Skills Gap: can gender balance fill the void?

 

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

 

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7h00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 7th of November at Science14 Atrium, rue de la Science 14-B, Brussels.

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

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INVITATION | What role for ‘Local Energy Communities’ in the EU energy transition process? (October 17)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the role of ‘Local Energy Communities’ in the EU energy transition process with our  distinguished speakers Mr Siim Meeliste, Counsellor for Energy, Estonian Presidency of the EU, Mr Antonio Lopez-Nicolas, Deputy Head of Unit, Renewable Energy and CCS Policy, European Commission, Dr Jan Ole Voss, Legal Advisor, European Renewable Energy Federation, Mr Josh Robert, Advocacy Officer, Rescoop.eu.

Mr Luis Arturo Hernández, Innovation Team Lead, Decentralised Energy Systems, E.ON will hold an introductory speech and participate in the panel.

The debate will be moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist.

This event is kindly sponsored by

About the debate

As the European Commission stated, ‘Renewable Energy Sources (RES) contribute to climate change mitigation through the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, achieve sustainable development, protect the environment and improve citizens’ health. Moreover, renewable energy is also emerging as a driver of inclusive economic growth, creating jobs and reinforcing energy security across Europe’. The executive body has also remarked on several occasions the crucial importance for the EU to become a world leader in renewable energies, not only for their added value to economic growth, job creation and energy security, but also due to the current evolutions of the international and diplomatic context. Accordingly, in October 2014, the European Council agreed on the ‘2030 framework for climate and energy’ by reaffirming the Union’s long-term commitment to the EU ambitious low-carbon energy strategy. EU institutions also identified 2030 as the year in which the European Union target of 27% of renewable energy consumption across Europe should be reached.

Alongside the EU decision-making process, a new model of energy production and consumption named ‘Local Energy Communities’ (LEC) has emerged across Europe; engaged citizens in a local energy community can lead to the creation of a local market, fostering local optimisation of supply and demand while at the same time facilitating the integration of renewables and enabling cost-effective grid expansion or operation. Furthermore, collective “self-prosumers” can become important enablers of the energy transition by promoting the uptake of electro-mobility and energy savings, boosting energy exchanges and encouraging the establishment of micro smart grids while increasing energy efficiency for the participating actors.

Although the Commission published a proposal for a recast of the 2009 RES directive and a proposal for a recast of the “Common rules for the internal market in electricity” (Electricity Directive) and the debate on both proposals in the Parliament is still in progress, the involvement of member states results of crucial importance, as they are both responsible for their respective national energy plans and free to reach the set targets according to their specificities. In addition, the successful implementation of the Local Energy Communities model depends not only on how European institutions will regulate the matter, but also on how the need for an efficient multi-level cooperation between European, national and local authorities will be met. As a result, at this point in time, it is still unclear to which extent the LEC system will be able to contribute to the transition of Europe towards a low-carbon economy.

What role for Local Energy Communities in the EU energy transition process?

 

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

 

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7h00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 17th of October at Science14 Atrium, rue de la Science 14-B, Brussels.

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

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Album photos | Débat | Quelles conséquences économiques pour l’UE après le départ du Royaume-Uni?

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Débat | Quelles conséquences économiques pour l’UE après le départ du Royaume-Uni? | Lundi 25 septembre

Nous sommes heureux de vous inviter à participer à une soirée de discussion autour de la question des conséquences économiques pour l’UE après le départ du Royaume-Uni avec nos orateurs: Madame Pervenche Berès, députe européen, membre de la commission des affaires économiques et monétaires, Madame Cinzia Alcidi, chef de l’Unité de politique économique, Centre d’études politiques européennes – CEPS et Monsieur Mathieu Maes, Secrétaire général, Chambre de Commerce Internationale – Belgique.

Monsieur Stéphane Lopez, Ambassadeur,Représentant de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’Ue, tiendra un discours d’introduction.

Le débat sera modéré par Gabriel Gresillon, correspondant à Bruxelles pour Les Echos.

En partenariat avec

À propos du débat

Suite au referendum du juin 2016, en mars 2017, la Grande Bretagne a notifié au reste des pays de l’UE son intention de quitter l’Union conformément à l’article 50 du traité de Lisbonne. La sortie du Royaume-Uni de l’UE a soulevé une série de questions politiques, économiques et légales complexes et de nature différente, y compris s’agissant des obligations résultant de l’Article 50. Comme l’établi cet article du traité sur l’Union européenne, la période de négociation prévue de deux ans s’écoulera le 30 mars 2019 étant donné que le gouvernement britannique a informé le Conseil de l’intention de se retirer le 29 mars 2017. Cette date pourra être prolongée seulement avec un vote à l’unanimité des Etats membres. En ce qui concerne les négociations, fin juillet, le négociateur en chef de la Commission, Michel Barnier, déclarait après le deuxième round des discussions que, si « celui-ci était consacré à la présentation de nos positions communes, le troisième devra être celui des clarifications ».

Suite aux premières déclarations officielles, les questions relatives aux droits des citoyens des deux parties résidant respectivement en Grand Bretagne et en Europe, aux obligations financières du Royaume-Uni vis-à-vis de l’Europe, aussi qu’à la frontière de l’Irlande du Nord sont apparues comme des domaines très sensibles. En outre, la question de la méthodologie à utiliser durant les négociations a aussi émergé, bien que d’une manière moins éclatante, plusieurs commentateurs la considérant comme un sujet crucial car la définition des conditions du retrait doit être réglée avant de conclure les termes des nouvelles relations commerciales entre l’UE et la Grande Bretagne. Compte tenu de l’importance des thèmes abordés lors des premières discussions, les conséquences économiques constituent l’aléa principal pesant sur les deux parties en question, même si peut-être dans une mesure différente. Au cœur de cette question demeurent les enjeux de la composition de la balance commerciale entre l’UE et le Royaume Uni, ainsi que ceux de la structure des deux économies, destinée à changer à cause d’un probable ralentissement ou fermeture aux échanges commerciaux et financiers, ainsi que les enjeux liés aux migrations, à la concurrence, à l’innovation, à la productivité, et, finalement, au potentiel même de croissance des deux économies, européenne et britannique.

Nonobstant, la majorité des analystes convienne que le Royaume-Uni a le plus à perdre étant donné qu’il exporte 44% de ses produits et services vers l’UE, dont un tiers dans le secteur financier, alors que l’UE exporte, elle, environ 18% de ses biens et services vers le Royaume-Uni, d’autres commentateurs sont convaincus que, à long terme, le Brexit pourrait aussi être porteur de conséquences économiques négatives pour les pays européens. Néanmoins, les changements attendus varieront en fonction des résultats des négociations. Quatre options ont été identifiées, de la moins favorable à la plus favorable aux échanges, à savoir : l’intégration du Royaume-Uni à l’espace économique européen à l’instar de la Norvège, un accord bilatéral d’association sur le modèle de l’accord UE-Suisse, un accord de libre-échange sur le modèle de l’Ukraine, le retour aux règles de l’Organisation Mondiale du Commerce.

Quelles seront les conséquences économiques et financières pour l’UE après le départ du Royaume-Uni ?

Ce évènement est régis par la règle de Chatham House Les participants sont libres d’utiliser les informations reçues, mais ni l’identité ni l’affiliation des participants ne peuvent être révélées. Pour cette raison, sauf autorisation expresse de PubAffairs Bruxelles, le tournage et/ou l’enregistrement des débats est strictement interdit.

L’événement commencera avec une réception à 19h00, suivie par un débat à 19.30.

Nous espérons d’avoir le plaisir de vous voir le 25 septembre  dans les locaux de Science14 Atrium, rue de la Science la 14-B, Bruxelles.

A la fin de chaque débat, les participants sont invités à continuer la discussion autour d’un verre dans une ambiance conviviale.

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The EU and the US: a relationship in motion, by M. Demertzis | Bruegel

Trade Agreement USA and EU. Symbol for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership TTIP

Europe’s post-crisis recovery has been disappointing in comparison with the USA. But lower rates of inequality are staving off populism and bolstering support for globalisation. With the USA an increasingly unpredictable partner, the EU must address internal imbalances and build alliances to defend the multilateral order. The legacy of the financial crisis has left a different trail in the EU economy by comparison to that of the US. Almost a decade after the start of what was undoubtedly the worst financial crisis in the last 50 years, the US has managed to restore financial stability and deliver a convincing path back to growth. The EU, by contrast, has not achieved a credible return to economic vigour. It is true that Europe has seen some renewed growth recently, but it remains weak and precarious. This is in part due to the EU’s weaker institutional resilience. High unemployment, particularly for the young, an excess of non-performing loans on banks’ balance sheets, and an incomplete banking union, all help explain the precarious nature of the stability and growth that we observe.

Read the full Article here

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PubAffairs Mid-Term Review | Past, Upcoming events & Editorial activities | July 2017

Dear Member/Follower,

We would like to thank you for your interest, participation and/or collaboration with PubAffairs.

We are pleased to announce that we are preparing for the next phase of our event series which will restart in September.

We are also pleased to give you an overview of our event series, which, from January to June 2017, included the following debates:

 

Sustainable City solutions: a central pillar for the next phase of the EU energy transition? 

Mr Dimitrios Sofianopoulos, New Energy Technologies, Innovation and Clean Coal, European Commission, DG ENERG, Ms Dorthe Nielsen, Policy Director, Eurocities, Mr Adrian Joyce, Secretary General, European Alliance of Companies for Energy Efficiency in Buildings (EuroACE) and Mr Marco Marijewycz, Technology Policy & Modelling, E.ON discussed the question of sustainable city solutions and their relevance with the next phase of the EU energy transition process.

The debate was moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist.

Event highlights available here | Event pictures available here


 

Payments security: do the EBA RTS on strong customer authentication create an open and secure market for retail payments in Europe?

Ms Silvia Kersemakers, European Commission, Retail Financial Services and Payments, DG FISMA, Ms Marie Pascale Brien, Senior Policy Advisor, European Banking Federation, Mr Matthias Hönisch, Head of Card Business Unit, National Federation of Cooperative Banks and Ms Emma Mohan-Satta, Fraud Prevention Consultant, Kaspersky Fraud Prevention, together discussed the effects of the recently released European Banking Authority’s regulatory technical standards on strong customer authentication and the creation of an open and secure market for retail payments in Europe.

Ms Emma Mohan-Satta held an introductory speech, while Mr Pascal König, Policy Advisor, E-commerce Europe, was also present for comments.

The debate was moderated by John Rega, Chief Correspondent, Financial Services at MLex

Event highlights available here | Event pictures available here

 


 

The ‘two-speed Europe’ project and the Brexit negotiations: a combined unity test? 

Ms Danuta Maria Hubner MEP (EPP/PL) and Mr Michael Theurer MEP (ALDE/DE) engaged in two topical matters for the future of the European Union while the UK was grappling with internal disagreements on both the timing of the triggering of Article 50 and the establishment of the extent to which the British Parliament should have controlled the Brexit process. In this context, the leaders of the EU’s four largest economies organised a meeting in Paris in order to prepare the 25th of March EU summit in Rome as well as to (re) launch the so-called ‘two-speed Europe’ proposal.

The debate was moderated by Graham Bishop, leading expert in EU and UK Economic, Financial and Government Affairs.

Event highlights available here | Event pictures available here

 


ETS and renewables: a win-win strategy?

Mr Peter Zapfel, Head of Unit, ETS Policy Development and Auctioning, European Commission, Mr Ruud Kempener, Policy Officer, Renewables and CCS Policy Unit, European Commission, Mr Michel Matheu, Head of EU strategy, EDF, and Mr Daniel Fraile, Senior Analyst, Wind Europe together discussed the long-standing issues of the emission trading system (ETS) revision, notably one of the European Union’s pivotal policy instruments for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) for the period 2021-2030.

Mr Florent Le Strat, Researcher and Expert, Climate policy R&D, EDF  held an introductory speech about a recent EDF study entitled “Towards a successful coordination of climate energy policies”.

The debate was moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist

Event highlights available here | Event pictures available here


 

What could be the features of the Pan-European Personal Pensions initiative (PEPP)?

Ms Nathalie Berger, Head of Unit, Insurance and Pension, European Commission, DG FISMA, Mr Heinz K. Becker MEP (EPP/AU), Mr Bernard Delbecque, Senior Director, Economics & Research, EFAMA and Mr Guillaume Prache, Managing Director, Better Finance discussed the European Commission’s  legislative initiative to launch a legislative framework for a Pan-European Personal Pensions (PEPP) system.

Ms Sultana Sandrell, Trade, Economic and Financial Affairs Unit, Maltese Presidency of the Council of the EU and Mr Philippe Setbon, Member of the AFG Strategic Committee, respectively held an introductory speech.

The debate was moderated by Mr Pierre Bollon, Chief Executive, French Asset Management Association.

Event highlights available here | Event pictures available here



Will the year 2017 be a defining moment for the EU? 

Mr Reinhard Butikofer MEP (Greens/DE), Mr Pawel Swieboda, Deputy Head of the European Political Strategy Centre (EPSC) and Mr Roland Freudenstein, Policy Director of the Wilfried Martens Centre for European Studies discussed the role of the European Union in the global context with special regard to Transatlantic relations as well as  the possible ways to finalise some of the most important initiatives related to the deepening of the EU integration process ahead of the Commission’s White Paper on the future of Europe.

The debate was moderated by Chris Burns, long-time journalist and moderator.

Event highlights available here | Event pictures available here


We hope you have enjoyed participating in our debates as well as following our daily news.

We will continue to keep you up to date on the latest cutting-edge EU-related issues trough our website, as well as through our social media channels.

 
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EVENT HIGHLIGHTS | Sustainable City Solutions: a central pillar for the next phase of the EU energy transition?

On the 20th of June, PubAffairs Bruxelles hosted a debate on sustainable city solutions as a central pillar for the next phase of the EU energy transition. Mr Dimitrios Sofianopoulos, New Energy Technologies, Innovation and Clean Coal, European Commission, DG ENERG, Ms Dorthe Nielsen, Policy Director, Eurocities, Mr Adrian Joyce, Secretary General, European Alliance of Companies for Energy Efficiency in Buildings (EuroACE) and Mr Marco Marijewycz, Technology Policy & Modelling, E.ON were all present as speakers. The debate was moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist.

Sustainable Cities WEB

Read the rest of this entry

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