Event series

INVITATION | Is a more integrated energy system the answer to the challenge of decarbonising Europe’s cities? (June 5)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on whether a more integrated energy system is the answer to the challenge of decarbonising Europe’s cities with our distinguished speakers Ms Andreea Strachinescu, Head of Unit, New energy technologies, innovation and clean coal, DG Energy, European Commission, Mr Paul Voss, Managing Director, Euroheat, Mr Thomas Nowak, Secretary General, EHPA, Prof. Peter Remmen, Institute for Energy Efficient Buildings and Indoor Climate, Aachen University and Mr Fredrik Rosenqvist, Director Innovation, E.ON.

The debate willl be moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist

This event is kindly sponsored by

 

This event is organised within the framework of the

About the debate

50% of the world’s population lives in cities. In the EU, that figure is even higher and demographic data suggests that this trend will continue to grow in the coming years.

Meanwhile, the EU’s global leadership in finalising the Paris Agreement sets a higher ambition which must be met with a will to deliver.

But what happens when these two phenomena – urbanisation and decarbonisation – collide? Millions more people will be living in cities in the coming years. Millions of people who will need clean, secure and affordable energy to heat their homes, power their cars and light their cities.

Experts already agree that there are enough thermal energy flows generated by human activity to provide the base for heating and cooling an entire city. In fact, it is possible to use and reuse all available thermal energy to decrease pollution and energy consumption.

As such, electricity, heat and transport can no longer be viewed as three separate sectors. They need to be integrated – working together to produce greater results. However, as the need for greater integration becomes more apparent and imperative, our energy systems’ reliance on non-integrated approaches to production, distribution and consumption is only growing.

The EU has gone someway in reshaping European energy policy to meet demand. The Energy Performance of Buildings Directive is encouraging member states to focus on measures that exploit the potential of heating and cooling for energy saving, while the upcoming Gas Directive specifically seeks to boost sector coupling.

Moreover, there are technologies in-play today that connect buildings with different needs and balance residual thermal energy flows between them, such as E.ON’s ectogrid.

It is clear that meeting our Paris targets will require more than a passing reference to sectoral integration. In fact, it could be the most important phase for our cities. We thus need to ask: is Europe ready? Does the EU have the right policies? Does it provide the right support for innovation?

In short, is a more integrated energy system the answer to the challenge of decarbonising Europe’s cities?

 

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

 

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7h00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 5th of June at the premises of The Office, rue d’Arlon 80, 1040, Brussels.

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

Photo Album | Debate | What role for energy storage systems in the EU energy transition?

INVITATION | What role for energy storage systems in the EU energy transition? (May 22)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the role of energy storage systems in the EU energy transition with our distinguished speakers Ms Andreea Strachinescu, Head of Unit, New energy technologies, innovation and clean coal, DG Energy, European Commission, Mr Per-Olof Granström Director, Energy, Centre on Regulation in Europe (CERRE), Mr Patrick Clerens, Secretary General, European Association for Storage of Energy (EASE) and Mr Jean-Baptiste Bart, Deputy Head, Economic and Technical Analysis of Energy Systems Department, EDF R&D.

Mr Michel Matheu, Head of EU Strategy & Stakeholder Relations, EDF, will hold an introductory speech.

The debate will be moderated by Hughes Belin, freelance journalist.

This event was kindly sponsored by

 

In support of

Within the framework of the

 

About the debate

Both in Europe and around the world, the question of climate change has urged all the concerned stakeholders to scale up efforts in finding innovative and efficient long-term solutions to facilitate a fast-paced transition to sustainable forms of energy production and consumption.

The EU has achieved considerable progress by reducing nearly a quarter of its emissions since 1990, while its GDP has more than doubled in the same period. Furthermore, as the European Commission stated in the 2017 and 2018 “State of the Energy Union” reports, new jobs, growth and opportunities for innovation and investments have been created. Nevertheless, both the efforts and positive results achieved this far need to continue for the EU to play the role of a global leader in de-carbonised smart energy systems.

More flexibility is needed in the electricity systems of the energy transition, in particular as a consequence of the variability of renewable energies. The development of many different uses of storage is therefore going to be encouraged. Storage is expected to bring value at different geographical and time scales, ranging from home and building scale so as to favour self-consumption, to regional one, storage being used for grid stability (short-term) and seasonal adaptation (mid-term).

Which value is expected to be created and how will it be shared between stakeholders? Which technologies can address which markets and when will they be mature?

What role for energy storage systems in the EU energy transition?

 

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7h00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 22nd of May at The Office,* rue d’Arlon, 80, Brussels.*

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

*Please note that the venue where we regularly hold our event series has changed

Album photos | Débat | La «Stratégie numérique» de l’UE pour les Balkans occidentaux: quel impact sur le processus d’élargissement?

[FR] INVITATION | La «Stratégie numérique» de l’UE pour les Balkans occidentaux: quel impact sur le processus d’élargissement? | Mardi 24 Avril

Nous sommes heureux de vous inviter à participer à une soirée de discussion sur le sujet de l’impact de la «Stratégie numérique» de l’UE pour les Balkans occidentaux sur le processus d’élargissement avec nos orateurs Madame Mariya Gabriel, Commissaire à l’Économie et à la Société numériques, Monsieur Johannes Noack, Membre du Cabinet du Commissaire Hahn, Politique européenne de voisinage et négociations d’élargissement, Madame Monica Macovei, Présidente de la Commission parlementaire de stabilisation et d’association UE-Albanie, et Madame Maja Handjiska-Trendafilova, Chef d’unité, Stratégie «SEE2020», Conseil de Coopération Régionale.

Monsieur Stéphane Lopez, Ambassadeur, Représentant de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’UE, tiendra un discours d’introduction.

Madame Mariya Gabriel, Commissaire à l’Économie et à la Société numériques tiendra le discours d’ouverture.

Le débat sera modéré par Quentin Ariès, journaliste freelance.

 

En partenariat avec

À propos du débat

Les pays des Balkans occidentaux sont confrontés à de nombreux défis économiques et sociaux alors qu’ils tentent d’achever une double intégration : entre les pays qui composent la région eux-mêmes et entre ces derniers et l’Union européenne. Le processus de Berlin a eu le mérite de remettre au centre de l’action politique de l’UE la question de l’élargissement et l’Union européenne a adopté une série de nouvelles initiatives pour soutenir le processus de réformes dans les pays de la région afin de soutenir leur intégration. Il s’agit notamment d’initiatives visant à améliorer la connectivité dans les secteurs de l’énergie et des transports, à favoriser le développement économique durable, à consolider l’état de droit et à favoriser le partage des valeurs européennes.

Cependant, comme le Président Juncker l’avait annoncé dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union, la Commission a adopté une stratégie qui offre une perspective d’adhésion selon le rythme et les mérites propres de chaque pays candidat ou potentiel candidat, ainsi qu’en fonction de résultats concrets. Quant à la Banque européenne pour la reconstruction et le développement, elle a lancé une “Plateforme Régionale pour les Investissements” et met l’accent sur la nécessité de rendre la région plus attractive pour favoriser la croissance économique et l’emploi, et sur le rôle de l’intégration régionale. C’est dans ce contexte qu’a émergé un sujet crucial pour le futur des relations entre les Balkans et l’UE: le lien inextricable entre la connectivité numérique et l’approfondissement de l’intégration économique et sociale entre pays des Balkans occidentaux.

En effet, si investir dans les infrastructures est fondamental pour la croissance économique, améliorer les infrastructures physiques seules ne suffira pas à atteindre les résultats souhaités en termes d’intégration régionale et de développement durable. Le sommet de Sofia, que la Bulgarie, présidente du Conseil de l’Union européenne jusqu’en juin, accueillera en mai prochain sera une étape fondamentale pour comprendre comment l’amélioration de la connectivité numérique et l’harmonisation des règles disparates qui y font aujourd’hui obstacle pourront influencer le processus d’élargissement.

Quel impact aura la «stratégie numérique» élaborée par l’UE pour les Balkans occidentaux sur le processus d’élargissement?

Ce évènement est régis par la règle de Chatham House. Les participants sont libres d’utiliser les informations reçues, mais ni l’identité ni l’affiliation des participants ne peuvent être révélées. Pour cette raison, sauf autorisation expresse de PubAffairs Bruxelles, le tournage et/ou l’enregistrement des débats est strictement interdit.

L’événement commencera avec une réception à 19.00, suivie par un débat à 19.30. Nous espérons d’avoir le plaisir de vous voir le 24 avril à 19.00 heures dans les locaux de The Office, rue d’Arlon, 80, Bruxelles.*

A la fin de chaque débat, les participants sont invités à continuer la discussion autour d’un verre dans une ambiance conviviale.

*Veuillez noter SVP que le lieu où nos événements se déroulent a changé

Photo Album | Debate | Is the lack of deeper European integration outranking any other EU threats?

INVITATION | Is the lack of deeper European integration outranking any other EU threats? (March 7)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion about whether the lack of deeper European integration is outranking any other EU threats with our distinguished speakers Ms Pervenche Berès MEP, Mr Pawel Swieboda, Deputy Head of the European Political Strategy Centre, European Commission, Mr Brando Benifei MEP and Mr Grégory Claeys, Research Fellow, Bruegel.

The debate will be moderated by Valentina Pop, Reporter, Wall Street Journal.


About the debate

Back in 2014 the newly appointed President of the European Commission Juncker presented his College as the “last chance Commission”. The tension underlying this statement was notably due to the fact that the European Union not only had to deal with a number of focal issues stemming, among others, from the eurozone and the migration crisis, but also with the social and political consequences which the same phenomena could have on the European political establishment in the years to come. The UK’s EU referendum in June 2016 added a further concern regarding the very basis of the European project, namely membership. Against this background, the outcomes of the Dutch, French, German and, to a lesser extent, Austrian elections, Europe’s encouraging economic performances and a renewed consciousness of the benefits of European integration paradoxically emerging from the Brexit process, have changed the scenario which European and national institutions alike are now faced with.

This scenario does not imply that the challenges and the questions posed by the so-called “populists” have been solved, nor that the effects of a decade-long recession have vanished nor that the Brexit process will not entail negative repercussions for the EU. Nevertheless, these improvements have induced several commentators to point out that Europe now has a window of opportunities, both during the current and the next legislative term, to push towards a series of widely solicited reforms of both its institutional structure and governance. In addition, if EU leaders appeared persuasive in advocating for Europe’s stances in global fora, the same fora have also stressed that Europe’s response to the current economic, diplomatic, environmental and technological challenges will need a more cohesive EU, which looks towards an increasingly complex, competitive and constantly-evolving world stage.

Juncker’s White Paper on the Future of Europe as well as the recently released EU strategy for the Western Balkans is a reflection of a renewed vigour in the European project. Notwithstanding this fact and while European institutions have been able to sail through rough waters and keep the perfect storm at bay, observers have remarked that the EU should engage more boldly on key topics, such as the eurozone reforms, the immigration question and the EU budget, not only in view of the European elections of mid-2019, but also in order to shore up the European project in the long term. Europe’s reforms are however a very delicate and complicated task as they touch upon several nerves which came to light even before the beginning of the economic and financial crisis. From an institutional perspective, as President Tusk remarked at the December’s EU Council “when it comes to EMU, the divide is […] between north and south, and when it comes to migration, it is between east and west”, whereas from a citizens‘ perspective, the backlash against Europe’s institutions is not only due to economic reasons, but also to an increasing identity crisis and progressive disenchantment with both the EU project and democracy at large. Indeed, the main reason why the EU finds it hard to put forward a series of structural reforms is that bitter disputes divide not just national governments, but the societies of each member state, as the national debate on the upcoming Italian elections, which may add further uncertainty to Europe’s way forward, is confirming.

Within this context, pundits are divided between those who would sooner leave plans for ambitious reforms, although desirable, for another day rather than launch them in a timid way, and those who proclaim the urgency of a significant change of path. By contrast, they all agree that the EU has the potential of playing a true leadership role on the world stage and that Europe is well positioned to reduce the negative repercussions of globalisation and to protect its citizens. Nonetheless, the question of whether the EU should undertake institutional and operational reforms remains; if, when, how, which domains will be involved and to what extent the reforms will be possible is yet to be seen. Is deeper European integration outranking any other threats of the EU?

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7h00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 7th of March at The Office, rue d’Arlon 80, 1040, Brussels.*

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

*Please note that the venue where we regularly hold our event series has changed

Album photos | Débat | Politique migratoire de l’UE et aide au développement en Afrique: dans quelle mesure peuvent-elles converger?

[FR] INVITATION | Politique migratoire de l’UE et aide au développement en Afrique: dans quelle mesure peuvent-elles converger?

Nous sommes heureux de vous inviter à participer à une soirée de discussion à propos de  la convergence entre la politique migratoire et l’aide au développement en Afrique avec nos orateurs M. Stefano Signore, Chef d’Unité, Migration, Emploi, Commission européenne, M.me Dorothee Starck, Chef du Département, Coopération au développement, Représentation permanente de l’Allemagne auprès de l’Ue, M. Charles Goerens, Député européen, Commission du développement, M.me Marie-Christine Vergiat, Députée européen, Commission des libertés civiles, de la justice et des affaires intérieures et M. Arnaud Zacharie, Secrétaire général du CNCD-11.11.11.

Monsieur Stéphane Lopez, Ambassadeur, Représentant de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’Ue, tiendra un discours d’introduction.

Le débat sera modéré par Hughes Belin, journaliste freelance.

 

En partenariat avec

À propos du débat

L’Union européenne a souvent dû se pencher sur la question de la cohérence des objectifs des politiques migratoire et de l’aide au développement. Néanmoins, suite à une forte pression migratoire ces dernières années, dont la pauvreté, l’instabilité, les conflits, et les dérèglements climatiques sont la cause, l’UE est en train de réviser ses politiques pour mieux répondre à cette situation de crise prolongée qui domine le débat politique interne. Elle s’est ainsi dernièrement dotée de plusieurs instruments, comme l’approche globale de la question des migrations et de la mobilité dans l’Union, l’agenda européen en matière de migration et le fonds européen pour le développement durable qui visent à combiner la protection des droits fondamentaux et l’aide aux migrants avec le soutien à long terme du développement économique de leurs pays d’origine.

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Album photos | Débat | Élargissement aux pays des Balkans occidentaux: urgence ou précipitation?