Special Events

[EN] INVITATION | LIVE STREAMING | Is a global consensus on non-personal data governance possible? (May 5)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the prospect and the importance of a global consensus on non-personal data with our distinguished speakers Mr Christophe Kiener, Head of Unit, Services and Digital Trade, European Commission, Ms Helen Stylianou, Deputy Head of the Australian Mission to the EU, Mr Javier Lopez Gonzalez, Senior Trade Policy Analyst, OECD, Mr Robert MacDougall, Head of Enterprise Public Policy, Vodafone Group and Mr Kevin Rogers, Head of Mobile Services, Panasonic.

Mr Alejandro Cainzos, Member, External digital connectivity, VP Vestager Cabinet, European Commission will hold the introductory remarks.

The debate will be moderated by Matthew Newman, EU Chief Correspondent, MLex

Given the current developments regarding the Covid-19 outbreak, our event series will be held in streaming.

This event was kindly sponsored by

Vodafone

About the debate

Over the last decade, the question of data flows has become a primary issue of concern for businesses, governments and citizens alike, both in Europe and across the world. At the EU level, along with the GDPR and the other EU data protection rules, the entering into force of last year’s regulation aimed at fostering the free flow of non-personal data in the internal market has marked the European Union’s formal recognition of data flowing as a pre-requisite for innovation, research and a successful finalisation of the digital transformation of the economy. Furthermore, the recently released EU Data Strategy has confirmed this stance by highlighting that the increasing volume of non-personal industrial data and public data in Europe, coupled with the current technological shift in how data is stored and processed, will constitute “a potential source of innovation and growth that should be tapped”.

At a global level, in January 2019, 76 countries, along with the EU, have supported the WTO E-commerce Joint Initiative, which made conspicuous the interrelation between e-commerce, trade and data. Subsequently, during the G20 summit of last June, Japanese PM Shinzo Abe launched the so-called “Osaka Track” with the aim of creating a framework to promote cross-border data flows with enhanced protections and safeguards for intellectual property, personal information and cybersecurity. On that occasion, the Prime Minister of Japan pointed out that “we must enable the free flow of medical, industrial, traffic and other most useful, non-personal, anonymous data to see no borders” and added that “the regime we must build is one for DFFT, Data Free Flow with Trust”. The potential of the data economy lies not only in technologies such as the internet of things (IoT), smart cities and online platforms, but also in the digitalisation of more traditional industry sectors such as logistics, agriculture and manufacturing. In addition to this, there is a widespread agreement among experts on the fact that this trend is being amplified by the shift from 4G to 5G-based technologies and the development of artificial intelligence (AI), which both, in turn, will allow smart applications and autonomous systems to unlock new tools and capabilities.

Twenty-four countries, including the United States and China, along with the EU, supported the “Osaka Track”. Yet, despite the unprecedented innovation, growth and societal value linked with the digital transformation of the economy, the questions surrounding the free flow of data have generated new policy challenges for European and global leaders alike. Indeed, addressing these issues at the global level has featured quietly but steadily, across the currently uneven global landscape. While some observers have remarked that the digital economy’s foundation is in danger due to current barriers to data flows, others have highlighted the potential of fostering an open, competitive and rules-based global digital economy through the enacting of new international rules to manage the fundamental driver of today’s global economic and societal advancement. Is a global consensus on non-personal data governance possible?

 

The audience will be able to ask questions during both the discussion and the Q&A session through sli.do #NonPersonalData

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

The event will commence at 6.00 pm and it will be held in streaming. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to hosting you at 6.00 pm on the 5th of May 2020.

[EN] INVITATION | Building synergies and optimising cooperation: how far can the EU cyber capacity go? (April 29)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the upcoming set up of a European Cyber Competence Centre and its partner national network and their role to enhance the EU cyber capacity with our distinguished speakers Ms Tamara Tafra, Counsellor for Cyber Issues, Croatian EU Presidency, Mr Miguel Gonzalez-Sancho, Head of Unit, Cybersecurity Technology and Capacity Building, European Commission, Mr Rasmus Andresen MEP (Greens/EFA,DE) and Mr Luigi Rebuffi, Secretary General European Cyber Security Organisation (ECSO).

The event will be moderated by Ms Vesela Gladicheva, Senior Correspondent, MLex

Given the current developments regarding the Covid-19 outbreak, our event series will be held in streaming.

 

About the debate

In the last decade, citizens, businesses and governments alike in Europe and across the globe have become increasingly dependent on digital technologies. However, along with the exponential increase of opportunities, the number, complexity and scale of cybersecurity threats and their impact on the economy and society have also grown. In addition, technological developments have de facto changed the very concept of security, as both strategic economic sectors, such as energy, finance, health and transports, and defence capacities largely rely on digital infrastructures. This trend is expected to increase with the roll out of Internet of Things (IoT), while the prospect of the shift from 4G-based to 5G-based technologies will further extend the array of opportunities and threats. For these reasons and as a result of the numerous EU initiatives aiming to foster and secure the Digital Single Market, the European Union is about to finalise, at an institutional level, the set up of a European Cybersecurity Industrial, Technology and Research Competence Centre, together with a Network of National Coordination Centres.

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[EN] INVITATION only | How to make Europe’s energy transition a reality with the help of smart technologies (February 19)

 

The European Smart Energy Solution Providers – ESMIG is delighted to invite you to an evening dinner which will be held on Wednesday, 19th of February from 18.30 to 21.30 at the European Parliament Members’ Salon, ASP 0 G salon, in Brussels.

The event will consist of a discussion on how to make Europe’s energy transition a reality with the help of smart technologies.

The event aims to gather a cross-national and cross-party group of MEPs, Policy Advisors and professionals from the private sector interested in the energy transition towards a digitalised, decentralised, consumer-focused energy system integrating renewables, as well as in the implementation of the Clean Energy for all Europeans Package. All of which is of crucial importance for a successful implementation of the EU Green Deal.

Although speakers and event details will be announced in the coming days, we would be delighted to receive an early positive answer from you.

Please note that this is an invitation only event.

 

About the event

The question of climate and the necessity to implement a highly needed energy transition has gained further momentum in the European and international global agenda. In addition, the new President of the European Commission, Ms Ursula Von der Leyen, pledged to make a “European Green Deal to become Europe’s hallmark” and appointed Mr Frans Timmermans as Executive Vice-President for the European Green Deal, as well as Climate Action Commissioner.

Within this context, the “importance of integrated, holistic and balanced non-market approaches”, as outlined in the Paris Agreement, has emerged as a crucial question of the energy transition process and has dotted the bottom lines for an energy-generation based on demand, rather than on market developments, as well as for a regulatory framework that encourages the trend towards a digitalised, decentralised, consumer focused energy system.

In fact, this approach concentrates the attention more and more on the implementation of the existing regulatory framework and emphasises the importance of the end-users, who should be able to become both producers and consumers, namely “prosumers”, and be incentivised to take a more active part in the energy transition due to the easy management of their own data.

As a result, the European Smart Energy Solution Providers (ESMIG) has pledged to enable the consumer to proactively engage in the European energy transition by using their data to manage their consumption, produce and store their own energy according to their demands, and potentially trade with other consumers or energy providers.

To make this new energy market a reality, a clear regulatory framework and a resolute policy implementation are necessary in order to create the right market conditions and to place the consumer at the heart of the energy system.

The guarantee of the security of data provided by the consumers and how to ensure their privacy are also matters of concern as the decentralised energy distribution systems may give more opportunity for cyber attacks, if they are not carefully designed and equipped to prevent them.

The event will commence with a welcome drink followed by the introductory and keynote speeches at 18.30 pm, and a dinner discussion at 19.30 pm.

During the dinner there will be the opportunity for questions and answers.


We look forward to seeing you at 18.30 pm on the 19th of February 2019 at the European Parliament Members’ Salon, ASP 0 G salon, Brussels.

[EN] INVITATION | SPECIAL EVENT | Digitalisation of SMEs: How to make it possible? (October 16)

DATE & TIME
Date: 16 October 2019
Welcome drink: 18h00
Event: 18h30-20h00
Cocktail reception: 20h00-21h00

WHERE
The Office, Rue d’Arlon 80, 1040, Brussels

PROGRAMME

WELCOME

Patricia Hoogstraaten, Vice President, EuroCommerce and General Manager, Vakcentrum, responsible for SMEs

KEYNOTE SPEECH

Petri Peltonen, Finnish SME Envoy

 

PANEL DISCUSSION

Ivan Štefanec, Member of the European Parliament and President of SME Europe

Jasmin Battista, DG CNECT, European Commission

Katerina Borunska, DG Research and Innovation, European Commission

Birgit Winn, Head of Digital Projects, Hospitality.Digital, METRO AG

Alexandre Nilo Fonseca, President of ACEPI (Portuguese Digital Economy Association)

Mira-Maria Kontkanen, Advisor, Federation of Finnish Enterprises

Marta Mikliszanska, Head of Public Affairs, Allegro

Moderation

Michael Acton, MLex Market Insights

 

CLOSING REMARKS

Henrik Reimer, Head of Office, SME Connect

#SMEsgodigital

This event is organised by

In cooperation with

About the debate

The digital transformation of the economy is underway, offering new market opportunities in Europe and all over the world. This technological shift is fostering both innovation and exchanges across EU borders, as well as the opportunity to secure a share in the emerging markets for current and future products and services.

Within this context, micro as well as small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are of strategic importance as they create two thirds of jobs in the private sector and contribute to more than half of the total added value generated by businesses in the EU. As the latest Annual Report on European SMEs states, the re-emergence of SMEs has continued over recent years, as this sector made a significant contribution to the recovery and subsequent expansion of the EU economy by accounting for 47% of the value added generated by the non-financial business sector between 2008 and 2017, and for 52% of the cumulative increase in employment in the sector.

However, SMEs are not taking full advantage of digitalisation offered by advanced technologies and innovative business models yet. They are faced with several challenges, from market access, to fully benefitting from public and private finance, the need to scale up, as well as to handle both data management and cyber threats. It is therefore crucial that the regulatory framework, SME instruments and programmes, such as the Digital Europe funding programme of the European Commission, ensure fair access to the single market and stimulate innovation. In addition, strengthening the regulatory framework of the Digital Single Market for SMEs should also include a constant reflection on existing policies and the need to further adapt them to the challenges of a fast-changing and increasingly competitive global environment.

***

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 18.00, followed by a panel debate at 18.30. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 18.00 on Wednesday, the 16th of October at the premises of The Office, rue d’Arlon, 80, Brussels.

The debate will be followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

***

*Notice: We ask you to consider whether the rules and regulations relevant to you allow you to participate in this event. We presume that, where necessary, permission to attend was granted by the relevant authority (e.g. a superior). METRO AG will settle any tax obligations arising from this event, in accordance with Section 37b of the German Income Tax Act. By registering to the event, you confirm, that you have taken note that we may record your image during the event and make it public. METRO and PubAffairs, as partner in this event, are committed to comply with all relevant rules and regulations according to the General Data Protection Regulation.

 

[EN] INVITATION | Towards global consensus on cybersecurity requirements (October 8)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the prospect of a global consensus on cybersecurity requirements with our distinguished speakers Ms Maija Rönkä, Counsellor, Telecommunications, Permanent Representation of Finland – Finnish Presidency of the EU, Mr Karel Lanoo, Chief Executive Officer, CEPS, Dr. Bart Preneel, Professor, KU Leuven and Dr. Thomas Voland, Partner, Clifford Chance.

The event will be moderated by Magnus Franklin, Director, Teneo cabinet DN and former Chief Correspondent at MLex.

This event is organised within the framework of the

European Cyber Security Month

About the debate

Cyber security of network and information systems is a global concern and is crucial for ensuring the smooth running of the economy, the efficiency of the public administration, and the well-being of citizens. These questions have been highlighted in Europe, with the European Union Institutions acknowledging the importance of network technologies as essential infrastructure. Within this context, the issue of cybersecurity gained the global spotlight again during the G20 meetings in June 2019, when the Osaka Track” framework for free cross-border data flow was launched.

Already introduced at this year’s World Economic Forum by the Japanese President, Sinzo Abe, the “Osaka Track” aims at the standardisation of rules in order to facilitate data flows across the world, while ensuring better protection in cybersecurity and privacy. However, views on cyber security and privacy protection vary across the globe. Several countries and trading blocs, such as the EU, are concerned about data sharing and how best to ensure resilience and security of network and information systems.

Although issues raised over 4G mobile networks were essentially commercial, ongoing discussions on 5G technologies have been highly politicised in Europe and at the global level as underlined by several commentators. This significantly diverts attention from raising the overall level of cyber security in the EU. The European Parliament Think Tank stated: “it is vital for the EU to preserve its strategic autonomy against the backdrop of geopolitical pressure”, while confirming that “security risks have arisen from a combination of technical and political concerns”. How do we drive towards global consensus on cybersecurity requirements?

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7.00pm, followed by a panel debate at 07.30pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 07.00pm on Tuesday, 8th of October at the premises of The Office, rue d’Arlon, 80, Brussels.

The debate will be followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

 

INVITATION | Quels défis pour le multilinguisme dans l’Union européenne d’aujourd’hui? (26 septembre)

 

 

 

 

 

Nous sommes heureux de vous inviter au débat organisé par PubAffairs Bruxelles et la Représentation Permanente de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF) auprès de l’UE sur les défis pour le multilinguisme dans l’Union européenne d’aujourd’hui avec nos orateurs M.me Anna-Maria Stan, Chargée politique, Écoles et Multilinguisme, Commission européenne – DG EAC, M.me Monica Semedo, Députée européenne (Renew Europe/FR), Commission de l’emploi et des affaires sociales – EMPL, Prof. Jacques De Decker, Secrétaire perpétuel de l’Académie royale de langue et de littérature françaises de Belgique et M.me Anna Sole-Mena, Auteur de « Multilingues dès le berceau. Éduquer les enfants en plusieurs langues ».

M. Stephane Lopez, Ambassadeur, Représentant de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’UE, tiendra un discours d’introduction.

Le débat sera modéré par M. Renaud Denuit, écrivant et éditorialiste pour Agence Europe

À propos du débat

La diversité linguistique est une des caractéristiques intrinsèques de l’identité et de l’histoire européenne et représente simultanément une richesse et un paradoxe. En effet, s’il existe bien une culture européenne, il n’existe pas une langue européenne, mais des langues européennes. Dans l’Europe d’aujourd’hui, outre les 24 langues officielles, on compte plusieurs langues régionales, sans compter les langues parlées par les citoyens originaires d’autres continents.Le Conseil de l’Europe a institué une journée européenne du multilinguisme en 2001 afin de mettre en avant la diversité linguistique de l’Europe, de promouvoir l’apprentissage des langues quelle que soit l’étendue de leur usage, et de favoriser la participation à la citoyenneté démocratique à travers les langues.

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INVITATION | Le dialogue interculturel dans l’Union européenne : quelles perspectives à l’horizon ? (18 juin)

 

 

 

 

 

Nous sommes heureux de vous inviter au débat organisé par PubAffairs Bruxelles et la Représentation Permanente de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’UE sur la question du dialogue interculturel dans l’UE et ses perspectives pour le futur avec nos orateurs M.me Catherine Magnant, Conseillère, Culture et Créativité, Commission européenne, M. Élie Barnavi, Professeur à l’Université de Tel Aviv, titulaire du prix «Grand prix de la Francophonie de l’Académie française», M. Alberto Alemanno, Professeur, Titulaire de la Chaire Jean Monnet en droit européen et régulation du risque, HEC, M.me Oriane Calligaro, Professeure, ESPOL Lille, professeure invitée au Collège de l’Europe  et co-directrice de la revue « Politique européenne », M. Renaud Denuit, Écrivain et Éditorialiste pour Agence Europe et M. Conny Reuter, Secrétaire Général, Solidar.

M. Stephane Lopez, Ambassadeur, Représentant de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’UE, tiendra un discours d’introduction.

Le débat sera modéré par M.me Florence Autret, Correspondante de La Tribune à Bruxelles.

À propos du débat

Le dialogue interculturel peut être défini comme un processus sociétal qui consiste en un échange ouvert et respectueux entre des individus, groupes et organisations ayant des visions du monde différentes. En effet, à la différence du multiculturalisme qui privilégie la préservation de cultures distinctes, le dialogue interculturel vise à établir des liens et des points communs entre différentes personnes et communautés, tout en favorisant la compréhension et l’interaction. Si l’interculturalisme a été reconnu par les institutions européennes et internationales comme essentiel pour éviter les conflits, la marginalisation ou l’éloignement entre citoyens et pour favoriser la cohésion sociale, cette approche de la gestion de la diversité culturelle est souvent méconnue dans le débat public européen. Comme le «Livre blanc» sur le dialogue interculturel du Conseil de l‘Europe le souligne, «le dialogue interculturel peut servir plusieurs objectifs, dans le cadre de l’objectif primordial qui est de promouvoir le respect des droits de l’homme, la démocratie et l’État de droit». Toutefois, le même texte relève que «les approches traditionnelles de la gestion de la diversité culturelle ne sont plus adaptées aux sociétés qui connaissent un niveau de diversité sans précédent et en constant développement».

L’absence de prise en compte des fortes divergences culturelles entre les États membres, au-delà de l’affirmation passive, et un peu convenue, de la maxime européenne: «Unité dans la diversité», et une politique culturelle parent pauvre de l’action communautaire, commencent à sérieusement poser problème. On peut légitimement se demander si cette situation n’est pas en grande partie à l’origine des différends communautaires, qui voient des affrontements entre les différents espaces culturels de l’Union européenne : Europe centrale et des Balkans, Europe hanséatique, Europe gréco-latine, dont les ressortissants ont des représentations très différentes de la dette, de l’immigration, etc., sources d’affrontement au Conseil. S’y ajoute le fait que les conséquences de la crise financière dans l’Union européenne ont accru l’animosité politique et sociale des peuples, alors que la progressive digitalisation de la société a augmenté la possibilité d’échanger et de diffuser les informations et les idées comme jamais auparavant.

Dans ce contexte, l’absence d’une prise en compte pensée de l’interculturalité européenne conduit à développer des perceptions stéréotypées et à établir un climat de méfiance et de tension parmi les Européens, ainsi qu’entre ces derniers et les citoyens du reste du monde. Si les Européens ne sont pas en mesure de se comprendre entre eux, on voit mal comment ils pourraient appréhender les peuples des autres continents. Sans surprise, le Livre blanc du Conseil de l’Europe remarque que « la disparition du dialogue au sein des sociétés et entre elles a pu, dans certains cas, offrir un terrain favorable à l’émergence et à l’exploitation par certains d’idées extrémistes».

L’Organisation internationale de la Francophonie (OIF) est née de la vocation au dialogue des Cultures ; forte de ses 88 États et gouvernements, répartis sur les 5 continents, elle en a l’expérience quotidienne.

À propos de votre participation

L’évènement commencera avec une réception à 19h00, suivie par un débat à 19h30.

Nous espérons avoir le plaisir de vous voir le 18 Juin à 19h00 dans les locaux de The Office, rue d’Arlon, 80, Bruxelles.

Cet évènement sera régi par la règle de Chatham House. Les participants sont libres d’utiliser les informations reçues, mais ni l’identité ni l’affiliation des participants ne peuvent être révélées. Pour cette raison, sauf autorisation expresse de PubAffairs Bruxelles, le tournage et/ou l’enregistrement des débats est strictement interdit.

A la fin de chaque débat, les participants sont invités à continuer la discussion autour d’un verre dans une ambiance conviviale.

 

INVITATION | La croissance économique de l’Afrique subsaharienne: quel rôle pour l’Europe ? (2 Avril)

 

 

 

 

 

Nous sommes heureux de vous inviter au débat organisé par PubAffairs Bruxelles et la Représentation Permanente de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’UE sur le rôle de l’Union européenne dans les enjeux liés à la croissance économique de l’Afrique subsaharienne avec nos orateurs M.me Erica Gerretsen, Chef d’unité, Coopération internationale et politique de développement, Commission européenne, S.E. M. Abdellahi Kebd, Ambassadeur de Mauritanie auprès de l’Union européenne, M. Paul Frix, Directeur général honoraire, Ministère belge des Affaires étrangères et de la Coopération au développement, Dr. San Bilal, Chef du programme « Commerce, investissement et finances », Centre européen de gestion des politiques de développement (ECDPM) et M. Emmanuel Tuchscherer, Directeur, Affaires Publiques Européennes, Engie.

Le débat sera modéré par M. Thierno Seydou DIOP, Associé, Conseiller Senior pour l’Afrique, Schuman Associates.

M. Stephane Lopez, Ambassadeur, Représentant de l’Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie auprès de l’UE, tiendra un discours d’introduction.

 

À propos du débat

Les relations entre l’Europe et l’Afrique subsaharienne ont récemment gagné de l’importance dans le débat public européen, notamment en raison du phénomène migratoire, rarement perçu de manière positive. Malgré cette perception, il a été reconnu par plusieurs institutions internationales qu’entre 2000 et 2017, l’économie de cette zone du globe a progressé au rythme annuel d’environ 5%, et le FMI a récemment estimé qu’entre 2018 et 2023 les perspectives de croissance de l’Afrique subsaharienne seront parmi les plus prometteuses au niveau mondial. Ce paradoxe entre représentations et dynamisme économique met en lumière la méconnaissance chez beaucoup des opportunités offertes par le continent à l’heure actuelle et des nombreuses à venir. En reconnaissant le lien inextricable entre l’UE et l’Afrique dans son discours sur l’état de l’Union de septembre 2018, le président Jean-Claude Juncker a proposé que l’UE « approfondisse ses relations économiques et commerciales avec l’Afrique par une politique axée sur les investissements et la création d’emplois ».

L’Union européenne est de fait le premier partenaire commercial du continent africain en sachant que 2017 a vu 36 % du commerce de marchandises de l’Afrique se réaliser avec l’Union, pour une valeur de 243,5 milliards d’euros. En outre, l’UE reste le marché du monde le plus ouvert aux exportations africaines. Le discours du président Juncker avait suivi le sommet entre l’Union africaine et l’Union européenne d’Abidjan en 2017, organisé afin de relancer le partenariat entre l’Afrique et l’UE et visant à renforcer la coopération économique, le développement durable, ainsi que la paix des deux continents. Les deux partenaires se sont en effet engagés à travailler ensemble sur le long terme et de manière stratégique, conscients que dans un monde de plus en plus interconnecté, leurs intérêts communs devraient comprendre aussi les enjeux du changement climatique.

Toutefois, malgré les signaux encourageants et les progrès en termes de croissance, l’Afrique subsaharienne est loin de représenter un environnement stable et prospère pour ses habitants. La majorité des progrès réalisés sur le continent peuvent être attribués à la croissance économique constante de la région et aux stratégies de réduction de la pauvreté mises en place. En effet, si l’Afrique subsaharienne a connu au cours des vingt dernières années un développement économique remarquable qui a contribué à réduire la pauvreté, les niveaux de croissance n’ont pas été suffisants pour générer une transformation structurelle et irriguer toutes les couches des sociétés. Si d’un coté, plusieurs commentateurs ont souligné le besoin d’investissements dans des secteurs tels que les infrastructures, la technologie et l’éducation, de l’autre, d’autres ont remarqué qu’il reviendra à l’Afrique d’inventer son propre modèle de développement, fondé sur une politique économique plus autonome et une véritable participation de la société civile.

Dans tous les cas, l’Organisation internationale de la Francophonie (OIF), qui compte quelque 30 États africains, demeure très attentive à la relation de l’Afrique envers l’UE.

L’évènement commencera avec une réception à 19h00, suivie par un débat à 19h30.

Nous espérons avoir le plaisir de vous voir le 2 Avril à 19h00 dans les locaux de The Office, rue d’Arlon, 80, Bruxelles.

Cet évènement sera régi par la règle de Chatham House. Les participants sont libres d’utiliser les informations reçues, mais ni l’identité ni l’affiliation des participants ne peuvent être révélées. Pour cette raison, sauf autorisation expresse de PubAffairs Bruxelles, le tournage et/ou l’enregistrement des débats est strictement interdit.

A la fin de chaque débat, les participants sont invités à continuer la discussion autour d’un verre dans une ambiance conviviale.

[EN] INVITATION | Reform of the World Trade Organization: challenge or deadlock? (January 29)

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the prospect of reforming the World Trade Organization with our distinguished speakers Mr Justin Brown PSM, Australian Ambassador to the European Union, Ms Maria Åsenius, Head of Cabinet of Commissioner Malmström, Mr David Luff, Professor, College of Europe and Mr Roderick Abbott, Senior Adviser, European Centre for International Political Economy (ECIPE).

Mr Jaya Ratnam, Ambassador of Singapore to the EU, will hold an introductory speech.

The event will be moderated by James Kanter, Editor, EU Scream, the podcast on Europe and its political extremes, and former EU Correspondent for The New York Times.

 

About the debate

As stated by EU Commissioner for Trade Cecilia Malmström:the multilateral trading system has for the past decades provided a stable, predictable and effective framework, helping many economies to grow rapidly”, while the WTO has played a crucial role in ensuring an open, fair and rules-based global trade system. However, in the last decades, both technological and geo-economic transformations have changed not only trade routes, but also the very landscape upon which the WTO rules-based system has been built. This process has resulted in several gaps due either to the fact that some regulations have become out-dated, for example, in the case of market-distorted subsidies, or as a result of a deficit in some increasingly important areas of international trade, such as e-commerce.

As a result of this setting, tensions regarding the current trade system have emerged as a serious threat to global economic growth and have raised several concerns about the fact that these dynamics, if not appropriately managed, could induce a resurgence of protectionist-driven policies across countries. Nevertheless, as Pascal Lamy recently argued, this setting has also emerged as an opportunity to make critical reforms to the WTO, a process which has remained stalled and elusive for too long. Within this context, the European Union has engaged in a constructive dialogue with its trade partners in international fora and put forward a concept paper to pursue the modernisation of the WTO based on three main principles, namely: updating the rule book on international trade, strengthening the monitoring role of the WTO and overcoming the imminent impasse regarding the dispute settlement system.

The Ottawa ministerial meeting at the end of October has emerged as a first sign of the willingness of several countries and trading blocs to foster reliable and predictable rules-based international commerce, whereas the G20 meeting in Buenos Aires at the beginning of last December resulted in a 90-day moratorium on increases in import tariffs to provide a window for negotiations between the US and China. Does reform of the World Trade Organization represent a challenge or deadlock?

 

This event will be held under the Chatham House Rule. Participants are free to use the information received but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the attendees may be revealed. For this reason, unless explicitly authorised by PubAffairs Bruxelles, the filming and/or the recording of the event by any means are strictly forbidden.

 

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 7.00 pm, followed by a panel debate at 7.30 pm. After the panel debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.


We look forward to seeing you at 7h00 pm on the 29th of January 2019 at The Office, rue d’Arlon, 80, Brussels.

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.

EVENT REPORT | How urgent it is for Europe to play an active role in the stability and prosperity of the Mediterranean region? (January 13)

The Inaugural Mediterranean Growth Initiative Report

The Mediterranean Growth Initiative (MGI) is a stakeholder platform supporting institutional and private sector thinking and doing around the Mediterranean.

Information and commentary from a Mediterranean regional lens is missing, though many of these economies have strong links, which have existed through history. The MGI rests on two key pillars: understanding the region and its potential using data and analysis, and bringing together key decision-makers and investors at seminars and conferences. To this end, the inaugural MGI economic indicators report was launched in Brussels on January 13th 2016. The report utilizes the latest data and in-depth analysis to track and benchmark performance in key strands of political, economic and societal progress, such as migration, trade and governance. It is the first of its kind, aggregating data for the region and for each of the 20 countries that share the shores of the Mediterranean sea. The indicators in the report serve as the basis for trustworthy and relevant information for investors and policy makers.

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Download the MGI Report here


AUDIO RECORDING


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EVENT INVITATION

How urgent it is for Europe to play an active role in the stability and prosperity of the Mediterranean region?

We are most pleased to invite you to participate in an evening of discussion on the role of Europe in the stability and prosperity of the Mediterranean region with our distinguished speakers Mr Roberto Ridolfi, Director for Sustainable Growth and Development, European Commission, DG DEVCO, Mr Bruno Denis, Head of Division, Public Sector/South, Neighbouring Countries Department, European Investment Bank, Mr Adel Baba-Aissa, Managing Director of Renewable Energy Partner and Mr Philippe de Fontaine Vive, European Investment Bank Honorary Vice-President.

Mrs Cleopatra Kitti, Chair of LITUS and founder of the Mediterranean Growth Initiative (MGI) and Dr Nasser Saidi, President, Nasser Saidi and Associates will respectively hold an introductory and a preface speech, while Mr Nick Spyropoulos, Director, Alma Economics, will present the key findings of the MGI report.


The debate will be moderated by Jacki Davis, journalist and moderator


This event was organised in partnership with


About the debate

The Mediterranean sea is bordered by twenty countries, which together account for 7% of world population and 10% of world GDP. The wealthy European countries occupying its northern shores, many now finally starting to emerge from a period of economic turmoil, enjoy a strong democratic tradition but are also characterised by an ageing population, sluggish growth rates, and weaker economic prospects. The less economically developed nations of the region in North Africa, South Eastern Europe and the Levant present almost a mirror image: young populations, political systems in transition, and impressive growth potential.

The launch of the Juncker Plan has kept economic performance and investment firmly at the top of the EU agenda. With GDP growth in countries in North Africa and the Levant forecast to stay above 4% -higher than the global average – in coming years and growth among the EU member states in the region expected to remain at the best at 2%, there is a clear economic opportunity for Europe.

Despite strong complementarities, common needs, and a long shared history, at the moment there is relatively little cooperation between Med countries at either the economic or political level: intra-Med trade accounts for less than a third of all trade Mediterranean countries engage in, and there are not enough political fora and initiatives aiming at closer political interaction.

Closer cooperation between Mediterranean countries and its positive effects on economic growth and stability may be secured by a renewed attention of the EU towards the region, notably by enhancing access to capital and sustaining good governance in order to empower both the private and the public sector to invest in education, infrastructure and innovation.

What impact can closer co-operation between Med countries have, and what does the EU stand to gain economically and also politically? How urgent is it for the European Union to play an active role to support growth, stability and the prosperity of the Mediterranean region?

The event will commence with a welcome drink at 6h00 pm, followed by a debate at 6h30 pm. After the debate there will be an opportunity for questions and discussions.

We look forward to seeing you at 6h00 pm on the 13th of January at Science14 Atrium, rue de la science 14-B, Brussels.

All our debates are followed by a drink in a convivial atmosphere.